THANK YOU DONORS (links)

We sincerely want to thank all those who help make the hunger Memorial Monument a reality.
Thank you to all our Donors!

Click On the Descriptions Below to contact them.
or Click here to see their NEW WEBSITE  www.plainviewirish.com

The Mid Island Irish American Club – A special treat at a night in Plainview
Dance Lessons: Every Monday 7pm and Ceili: Every First Saturday 8pm-12am
Donations $20 Cofee,Tea and Soda Bread you can contact them at:
Plainview Ceili
115 Southern Parkway
Plainview, NY 11803
www.plainviewceili.com

 


Thank You to Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray!

Kate Murray is the Supervisor of America’s largest township.
We are honored to have her support our monument.


Thank You to Nassau Legislator Walker!

Nassau Legislator Rose Marie Walker is an important asset. Her Service on the Veterans & Senior Affairs as well as Health & Social Services committee promotes our efforts as well.


Suffolk County Police Officer’s Emerald Society.

Member of Grand Council United Emerald Society of NY
Thank you, your donation helps bring life to this monument
Our condolences on the passing of Msgr. Jim Kissane.



We are very grateful to supporters listed below.

Mention you heard about them from the A.O.H.!

 

THANK YOU TO

Need a SPECIAL IRISH GIFT for anyone? Just visit the,

Lynbrook Irish Shop
144 Hendrickson Avenue,
Lynbrook NY 11563
516-612-3487

 

Fine Irish Atmosphere :

Trinity Pub and Restaurant
190 Jericho Turnpike
Floral Park,  NY 11001

Too Busy to Prepare Dinner Call: Cheryl

Dinner My Way
547 Bedford Ave
Bellmore, NY 11710

 



We also wish to thank

The Doherty Family
The Bradli Family
The White Family
The O’Brien Family

An Gorta Mor

Ireland’s Great Famine or The Great Hunger, as it is more commonly referred to today, ranks among the worst tragedies in the sweep of human history. Between 1845 and 1850, approximately 1.5 million Irish men, women and children died of starvation or related diseases. By 1855, more than two million more fled Ireland to avoid a similar fate. This decimation of her population makes Ireland’s Great Hunger both the worst chapter in the country’s history, and arguably, the single worst catastrophe in 19th century Europe.

Exhibition Information – New York City

Ireland’s Great Hunger
An Gorta Mor: The Quinnipiac University Collection in New York City
May – September 2010

When: Friday, May 21 – Friday, Sept. 3, 2010
Hours: Weekdays, 12 noon to 2PM. Please call for appointment. Free admission.
Where: Consulate General of Ireland
345 Park Avenue
Floor 17
New York, NY, 10154
Phone: (212) 319-2555
(203) 582-8655
For questions regarding the exhibit, please call the phone numbers above.

An Gorta Mor – Exhibition

(ended September 2010)

Ireland’s Great Famine or The Great Hunger
the worst catastrophe in 19th century Europe.

For more information click here

An Gorta Mor

Ireland’s Great Famine or The Great Hunger, as it is more commonly referred to today, ranks among the worst tragedies in the sweep of human history. Between 1845 and 1850, approximately 1.5 million Irish men, women and children died of starvation or related diseases. By 1855, more than two million more fled Ireland to avoid a similar fate. This decimation of her population makes Ireland’s Great Hunger both the worst chapter in the country’s history, and arguably, the single worst catastrophe in 19th century Europe.

An Gorta Mor: The Quinnipiac University Collection in New York City
May 21 – Sept. 3, 2010 from Noon to 2PM.


Videos “Bloody Sunday” Apology, “The Way Home”

Britain’s “Bloody Sunday” Apology
Decades after the “Bloody Sunday” attack in Northern Ireland, Britain’s Prime Minister apologized after a long-awaited report found no justification for the attack. Mark Phillips reports.


Watch CBS News Videos Online


“THE WAY HOME”The <code>Way Home Video Essay

This video presents the history, goals and mission of the Ancient Order of Hibernians.

The National board recommends all members should view this video.  And pledging members should view this video before taking the oath.

You may need a media player installed to view.

-> DONATE to the HUNGER MEMORIAL FUND <-

Contact any board member or Jack at (516) 724-6821
or email by clicking here AOH11@LIVE.com

Or help by purchasing a raffle or two.

All proceeds are for the Hunger Memorial fund.



Just by clicking the “DONATE” button below you can donate directly to

the Ancient Order of Hibernians Div. 11 Hunger Memorial Fund using your credit card in any amount you desire.

Think, How great would you feel to be part of this project.
Help Place a Permanent Memorial for the ages! 

Contact us for more information.

Thank you

EASTER MONDAY MONUMENT

Each year the Monday after Easter Sunday there is a ceremony to mark the Easter Uprising in 1916.

Rededicated in 2009 and restored with a new 32 string Irish Harp capstone.

  • The Irish Monument for EASTER MONDAY MEMORIAL in Nassau County.The Irish Monument Committee, comprised of representatives of The Ancient Order of Hibernians; Irish American Society of Nassau, Suffolk and Queens; Irish Cultural Society, Garden City; Irish Northern Aid; Police Emerald Society, Nassau County Chapter; The Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick on Long Island; and Irish Americans in Government and a grant from the Republic of Ireland, have united for the purpose of refurbishing and finishing the Easter Monday Commemoration Monument immediately south of the Nassau County Courthouse in Mineola, New York.The Monument, first dedicated in 1979 as a result of the efforts of Francis Purcell, Denis Dillon, Peter King and many others in the Irish community, was last refurbished in 1993 with funds donated by the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick on Long Island. The Monument, which honors the memory of those who have struggled for human dignity, human rights and Irish unity, commemorates the Easter Rising of 1916. Wind and weather have taken their course and the Monument was in need of refurbishing, repair, as well as the installation of the top of the Monument.

CELTIC CROSS

CELTIC HIGH CROSSES

What we generally call Celtic Crosses are memorial crosses: the Latin cross with the crescents forming a circle between the cross and upright beams. They take their form from the Irish High Crosses which are found throughout Ireland and in parts of Britain and Scotland where Irish monks founded monasteries. They were usually located around monasteries although they sometimes marked boundaries or market places.

The total height of the cross, including the base and cap (shaped like a roof) varied – 7 feet up to 24 feet.  Some historians suspect that the term high cross does not refer to the height of the cross but to its status. In Irish the word Árd is usually translated as high but also means principal or main. The origins of the characteristic ring have several theories. The simplest is as a support for the cross beam. That seems just too simple an explanation since a straight piece with 45 degree angle from the upright at each side would be much easier to carve although less pleasing to the eye.

There are other explanations here are a few:

The ring is made to form a halo representing Jesus to a symbol of eternity to a leftover reference to the carried over from the art representing the Irish Sun God from ancient times. Other characteristics were the scalloping on the shaft and cross beam where the crescents join. Many crosses were also decorated with scenes from the old and new testaments. Small decorative cylinders called volutes are also found attached to either the crescent or the shaft. There were two main periods when the crosses were erected through the 9th and 10th centuries, and again in the 12th century. The 9th and 10th century crosses are known as scriptural crosses because of their biblical scenes. The East facing side had the Old Testament and the West side the New Testament. The later crosses had fewer biblical scenes but more of high relief figures of Jesus and a local Saint or Bishop. These carvings are similar to those found in Roman and other Western European churches and monasteries. It is believed that monasteries turned to erecting the crosses since they would be less prone to destruction. Many precious objects and manuscripts had been looted and destroyed during the Viking raids.

Many of the crosses have been carved from sandstone which I believe may be a relatively easy material to work with. But others have been carved from limestone and granite.

For more detail see:
www.goireland.about.com/od,
http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/highcrosses/intro.html
www.highcrosses.org

and a temporary exhibit for  Irish High Cross at the 

National Museum of Ireland – Decorative Arts & History.